Epidemiological Studies Can Not Be Trusted.

 They, in all cases, cannot be used at all to ‘suggest’, ‘provide evidence’, or anything that might be interpreted as causing any effect, period.

To use epidemiology thusly is a travesty of rational thought. Basically they have very limited scientific utility. All that they can do is to say, “these effects were found in this group under these circumstances, with the caveats: 1) there are many unaccounted-for and in fact unknown confounders; 2) the data is suspect due to the way it was gathered; 3) any causal suggestions are totally conjectural; 4) science journalists should understand that research conclusions herein using words such as ‘linked to’, ‘associated with’, ‘shows’, ‘may be’, all are used in a scientific sense that is quite different from the usage by the man on the street, who thinks, not unreasonably, that these terms imply causality; and that 5) since this is an epidemiological study, it is by definition almost worthless, and should only be used to encourage debate and actual experimentation.”

The problem is many scientists have made a living at data-mining the old, long-term studies for new papers for so long, the methodology is very entrenched. And unfortunately, it does not lead to good experiments as often as it should, so the original ‘conclusions’, no matter how unjustified, hang in the scientific & public consciousness for a long time.

So next time you see some news artcle, headline, nightly-news-scare, or whatever, claiming that “red meat will kill you”, or some crazy nonesense, ask yourself “where’s the information coming from?”

Correlation is not causation. This is 6th grade stuff. Get with it people.

I really love bacon

Resistance Training to Momentary Muscular Failure Improves Cardiovascular Fitness in Humans

Resistance Training to Momentary Muscular Failure Improves Cardiovascular Fitness in Humans: A Review of Acute Physiological Responses and Chronic Physiological Adaptations

Need I say more?

Abstract: Training to Momentary Muscular Failure Improves Cardiovascular Fitness in Humans: A Review of Acute Physiological Responses and Chronic Physiological Adaptations. JEPonline 2012;15(3):53- 80. Research demonstrates resistance training produces significant improvement in cardiovascular fitness (VO2 max, economy of movement). To date no review article has considered the underlying physiological mechanisms that might support such improvements. This article is a comprehensive, systematic narrative review of the literature surrounding the area of resistance training, cardiovascular fitness and the acute responses and chronic adaptations it produces. The primary concern with existing research is the lack of clarity and inappropriate quantification of resistance training intensity. Thus, an important consideration of this review is the effect of intensity. The acute metabolic and molecular responses to resistance training to momentary muscular failure do not differ from that of traditional endurance training. Myocardial function appears to be maintained, perhaps enhanced, in acute response to high intensity resistance training, and contraction intensity appears to mediate the acute vascular response to resistance training. The results of chronic physiological adaptations demonstrate that resistance training to momentary muscular failure produces a number of physiological adaptations, which may facilitate the observed improvements in cardiovascular fitness. The adaptations may include an increase in mitochondrial enzymes, mitochondrial proliferation, phenotypic conversion from type IIx towards type IIa muscle fibers, and vascular remodeling (including capillarization). Resistance training to momentary muscular failure causes sufficient acute stimuli to produce chronic physiological adaptations that enhance cardiovascular fitness. This review appears to be the first to present this conclusion and, therefore, it may help stimulate a changing paradigm addressing the misnomer of ‘cardiovascular’ exercise as being determined by modality.

Cholesterol meds are for dummies

Cholesterol 101

Cholesterol is the mother of all hormones. It is produced and regulated by your body, and is responsible for a host of bodily functions. It is a necessary component of every day life.

Cholesterol is a critical component of cell membranes, the precursor to all steroid hormones, a precursor to vitamin D, and the limiting factor that brain cells need to make connections with one another called synapses, making it essential to learning and memory.

Here’s a few examples.

Brain function

[1] In the late 1990s and early 2000s, research was pointing to an unknown compound made by glial cells that was responsible for the ability of neurons to form synapses, or connections between each other.

Thoughts, memories, learning, and all mental function is dependent on the formation of synapses, so the ability to form them will directly impact mental functioning and health.

In the absence of this– as yet unknown– “glial factor,” neurons formed few synapses, and the synapses they formed were inefficient and poorly functioning. In the presence of glial cells, which secrete the unknown factor, neurons formed many, highly efficient synapses.

So what is this “glial factor”?

Research in 2001, by Mauch, et al., published in volume 294 of Science magazine, determined that the unknown glial factor is cholesterol, which is released by the glial cells in a carrier called “apolipoprotein E.”5

Steroid Hormones

Cholesterol is the precursor to all steroid hormones, including:

  • Glucocorticoids (blood sugar regulation)
  • Mineralcorticoids (mineral balance and blood pressure regulation)
  • Sex Hormones (many functions)

Cholesterol is the precursor to a hormone called pregnenolone, which has important functions itself, but is also the precursor to all other steroid hormones.

Pregnenolone is converted to progesterone, a sex hormone, which in turn is converted into cortisol, which regulates inflammation and blood sugar, aldosterone, which regulates mineral balance and blood pressure, or testosterone, a type of sex hormone referred to as an androgen, which regulates libido, muscle mass, and plays other roles.

In females, and to a lesser degree in males, testosterone is further modified, undergoing conversion to estradiol, a different type of sex hormone called an estrogen.

Harvey et al., Biochemistry: 3rd Edition, Baltimore: Lippincott, 2005, pp. 235-238.

Vitamin D

Since cholesterol is a precursor to vitamin D, inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol will also inhibit the synthesis of vitamin D. Since sunlight is required to turn cholesterol into vitamin D, avoiding the sun will likewise undermine our ability to synthesize vitamin D. And since vitamin D-rich foods are also rich in cholesterol, low-cholesterol diets are inherently deficient in vitamin D.

Vitamin D is best known for its role in calcium metabolism and bone health, but new roles are continually being discovered for it, including roles in mental health, blood sugar regulation, the immune system, and cancer prevention. Yet standard modern advice — take cholesterol-lowering drugs, avoid the sun, eat a low-cholesterol diet — combined with a recommended daily intake of vitamin D that is only a tenth of what many researchers believe to be sufficient all seems to pave the way for widespread vitamin D deficiency.

Perhaps that’s why, according to Dr. John Cannel, President of the Vitamin D Council,most whites and nearly all blacks in modern society are deficient in vitamin D.

 

Cellular Helth

[2] Surrounding each of our cells is a membrane called the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is a continuous double-layer of phospholipids, interweaved with cholesterol and proteins. Phospholipids are composed of two fatty acids attached to a phosphate compound as a head.

The phosphate head is water-soluble, also called “hydrophilic” (water-loving), and the fatty-acids are water-insoluble, or “hydrophobic” (water-fearing). Since outside the cell is a water-containing, or aqueous, environment, and inside the cell is also aqueous, the phosphate heads of the phospholipids face both the cell’s inside and the environment outside the cell, while the fatty acids face the inside of the membrane.

Without cholesterol, cell membranes would be too fluid, not firm enough, and too permeable to some molecules. In other words, it keeps the membrane from turning to mush.

 

Cholesterol does not play a role in Heart attack, stroke, or atherosclorotic plaque formation

Read the clear and detailed explanation [here] Near the bottom of that page. It outlines exactly how plaques form. I’ll give you a hint…it’s not related to cholesterol at all.

Side Effects of Cholesterol Lowering Drugs

The list of statin side effects is a long one. Known side-effects of statins include muscle weakness and/or pain (myopathy), liver damage , kidney failure and cataracts. It gets worse. Statins inhibit CoQ10 synthesis. Statins also cause memory loss, transient global amnesia, and lowered sex drive. Low cholesterol has even been strongly linked with diabetes and cancer

And it’s not surprising, given that cholesteol is responsible for so many critical bodily functions (see above). And side effects are likely much more common than is actually reported, yet cholesterol itself appears to play no functional role in heart disease.The FDA also issued a new warning against statins because of the occurrence of side effects.

But What About the Studies?

Most of the studies are produced and funded by the same corporations that make statins, and it’s a multi billion dollar industry. They are rife with conflicts of interest. They are heavily biased towards “positive results”. They even continue to lower the “standard for healthy cholesterol levels” so they can justify prescrbing it to children. What an industry!

Many of the studies done only look at the fact that the drugs were able to lower cholesterol. But a closer look at any of them will show you that heath either declined or did not improve. Now we can see this deception, because we understand that cholesterol has noting to do with it!

The studies that attempt to link high cholesterol with heart disease are only epidemiological, which means they are nothing more than surveys that attempt to make correlations between two variables. And as any good scientist will tell you, CORRELATION IS NOT CAUSATION CORRELATION IS NOT CAUSATION CORRELATION IS NOT CAUSATION CORRELATION IS NOT CAUSATION CORRELATION IS NOT CAUSATION CORRELATION IS NOT CAUSATION CORRELATION IS NOT CAUSATION!!! Not to mention, the correlations are often weak with little supporting evidence.

Epidemiological studies are incapable of drawing conclusions and proving causation. You can not discover a factual mechanism of action by utilizing an epidemiological survey. All these people are doing is linking ice cream sales with murders. Ice cream sales correlate very strongly with murders, but this does not mean that we should ban ice cream, it means that more murders happen in the summer time. A very simple but effective example of the drawbacks of “survey studies”.

Stop Popping Pills!

New studies continue to punch holes in the cholesterol/heeart health hypothesis. It’s becoming abundantly clear that we are going about it the wrong way. But the system (health insurance, doctor salaries, pharmaceutical industry) has a vested interest in keeping things the way they are. It’s true that it’s difficult to get a man to see the truth when his salary depends on ignoring it.

Taking statins may reduce your cholesterol, but the effects on health are negative. You will be weak, fat, and stupid, if the low cholesterol levels don’t kill you first. (Or if you don’t kill yourself first because your dick doesn’t work anymore…)

Dublin S, et al. Statin use and risk of community acquired pneumonia in older people: population based case-control study. BMJ 2009;338:b2137

Benati D, et al. Opposite effects of simvastatin on the bactericidal and inflammatory response of macrophages to opsonized S. aureus. J Leukoc Biol. 2010;87(3):433-42

Hippisley-Cox J, et al. Unintended effects of statins in men and women in England and Wales: population based cohort study using the QResearch database BMJ 2010;340:c2197

Acidosis and bone health. Science or Science Fiction?

This is one of those topics that is pushed hard (mostly by Veg*ans) as the ultimate proof against a protein rich diet.

Their claim is that consuming a diet high in protein causes an acid balance in the blood, leaching calcium from your bones, osteoperosis blah blah blah. The only way to fix this, apparently, is to consume an alkaline diet rich in veggies and fruit, and avoid meat completely (because we all know, meat also causes cancer and heart disease! oooh noooo!)

Ok, lets assume that acidosis is real.

So if an acid balance in the blood is bad, than an alkaline balance in the blood is good, right? Carried to its logical extreme, we would want to avoid acidosis causing foods all together. Their reasoning is that cancer cells can’t survive in an alkaline environment. This is true, but neither can the other cells in your body! The extreme end of the spectrum, metabolic alkalosis, is not suitable for any cells to live. You will die. You must understand that there is a spectrum here, and at either extreme, acidosis or alkalosis, we’re in danger.

Of course, while both acidosis and alkalosis are definitely medical issues, neither are likely and neither dichotomy is the way it really works. Lucky for all of us, evolution equipped the body with a range of ways to keep blood pH in the proper range and you’re not going to outdo your acid-base metabolism by eating too much meat, dairy, grains, or anything else.

The origination of the “acidosis” argument.

The China Study, by Campbell, which has been thoroughly debunked [here], was a pretty awful epidemiological study, full of errors, statistical miscalculations, unfounded conclusions, and straight up fabrication in some instances. The study was conducted and designed to make meat the villain and defame all animal products. The main problem, however, is that correlation does not equal causation.

Anyway, here is what Campell et al concluded:

Animal protein, including that from dairy products, may leach more calcium from the bones than is ingested, said Campbell, professor of nutritional biochemistry at Cornell and director of the Cornell-China-Oxford Project, the most comprehensive project on diet and disease ever conducted.

Campbell [and other collaborators] analyzed the role of dietary calcium in bone density by following closely the diets of 800 women from five counties that have very different diets in China. … Analyses of these data suggest that increased levels of animal-based proteins, including protein from dairy products, “almost certainly contribute to a significant loss of bone calcium while vegetable-based diets clearly protect against bone loss,” Campbell reported.

Interesting. So Campell drew a conclusion and causation from his correlation. A fallacy.

Let’s now turn to the discussion over at Whole Food SOS

“But, do the summaries above match up with the data? First, let’s look at what each county was typically eating:”

“As you can see, Xianghuangqi ate a pretty shabby diet as far as whole-foods veganism is concerned: We’ve got dairy galore, beef, mutton, wheat flour, a mere smattering vegetables, and millet. Their bones should be snapping like peanut brittle! Tuoli’s not much better, what with their milk tea, animal flesh, and decided lack of green leafy veggies. More bone snappage, right?

I’ll let the paper speak for itself:

Analysis by individual for all counties combined showed that [bone mineral content] and [bone mineral density] were correlated positively with total calcium (r = 0.27-0.38, P < 0.0001), dairy calcium (r = 0.34-0.40, P < 0.0001), and to a lesser extent with nondairy calcium (r = 0.06-0.12. P = 0.001-0.100), even after age and/or body weight were adjusted for. The results strongly indicated that dietary calcium, especially from dairy sources, increased bone mass in middle-aged and elderly women by facilitating optimal peak bone mass earlier in life.

Did you catch that? Dairy calcium—far more than plant calcium—was linked with stronger bones. Moreover, the paper notes that “nondairy calcium … showed no association with bone variables after age and/or body weight were adjusted for”

Now, here’s where Campbell makes his unfounded conclusion about non-dairy animal protein (from Whole Food SOS again):

“The associations between bone mass and other nutrients, like dietary protein and phosphorous, were also examined. However, none of these nutrients showed an association with bone mass as significantly as did dietary calcium, although an inverse correlation was observed consistently for nondairy animal protein.”

“Unfortunately, that’s the only blurb in the entire paper that mentions animal protein in relation to bone mass, so we can’t see the data behind the “consistent inverse correlation.” In the context of this study, though, it makes sense: Protein has a complex relationship with bone formation, serving as a synergist when calcium intake is adequate, but as a potential antagonist when calcium intake is low. In other words, the effects of protein on bone health depend on how much calcium you’re taking in.”

Bingo. as long as you are eating properly, and not just downing protein powder as your only source of food, you will be consuming adequate calcium and fat soluble vitamins, like K2, which support proper calcium metabolism.

“In addition, if animal protein was such a bone-killer and plant protein was bone protective, we’d see vegetarians or vegans having the best outcomes in the bone department. But this just ain’t the case. At best, non-meat-eaters are equally matched with their omnivorous counterparts; at worst, they’re more prone to fracture:

So, although the “calcium-leeching” properties of animal protein is a common battle cry in the vegan world, the research just doesn’t support it…”

There is no evidence in the real world that food changes the pH of the blood.

Just like the myth that eating high cholesterol foods raises serum levels of cholesterol. It doesn’t (Even if cholesterol mattered).

Also, there is a persistent myth that ketosis is dangerous: it’s not. People (including some doctors) commonly confuse it with ketoacidosis, a pathological state usually only found in uncontrolled diabetics and (rarely) raging alcoholics.

Acidosis, DEBUNKED!

You may also like to read ths very detailed article by Chris Masterjohn regarding acid/base diets: Does meat really leach calcium from your bones?

Like this post? Leave a comment!

Want to find out more about how to get in shape fast? Check out these articles about getting in shape, feeling great, and controlling your genes!

Lose stubborn body fat. (Intermittent fasting)

Control your gene expression.

Heavy strength training is a required aspect of long term health. For everybody.

High intensity interval training (HIIT).

Why you should avoid polyunsaturated fats.

What is chronic inflammation.

The final word on healthywholegrains and legumes.

The final word on Saturated fat and Cholesterol.

Hunter-Gatherer origins of hook-up culture vs. modern westernized social standards

One of the oldest hunter-gatherer societies still in existence, the !Kung, provides enlightening views on ancestral human sexual selection.

Mankind has spent 99% of his existence living the life of a hunter gatherer, therefore, by getting a glimpse into the thought processes of Nisa [main subject of this book] we simultaneously shed light on who we were at the beginning of time and how little we’ve changed despite this brief appearance of the modern conveniences of civilization.

The often repeated theorem by evolutionary biologists that we could not have possibly populated this planet by starting off as faithful monagamous pair bonds is brought into clear view by Nisa’s revelations. The sexual strategies employed by our highly social ancestors were the result of hundreds of thousands of years of refinement via sexual selection. The prevalence of bawdy sexual behavior and a prevailing hookup culture on many college campuses attests to the fact that despite our western conveniences, our westernized religions, and our PC indocrination, we have changed vey little if any since our emergence 100,000 years ago.

We see these two relationship phases arise within the hunter-gatherer society:

In psychoanalytic literature, a Madonna–whore complex is the inability to maintain sexual arousal within a committed, loving relationship.[1] First identified by Sigmund Freud, this psychological complex is said to develop in men who see women as either saintly Madonnas or debased prostitutes. Men with this complex desire a sexual partner who has been degraded (the whore) while they cannot desire the respected partner (the Madonna).[2] Freud wrote: “Where such men love they have no desire and where they desire they cannot love.”[3] Clinical psychologist Uwe Hartmann, writing in 2009, stated that the complex “is still highly prevalent in today’s patients”.[2]

The view of women as either Madonnas or whores limits women’s sexual expression, offering two mutually exclusive ways to construct a sexual identity.[4] The duality implies that women must assume subservient roles, either as madonnas to be protected or as whores to be punished by men.[5]

The original experiments with rats applied the following protocol:[6] A male rat was placed into an enclosed large box with four or five female rats in heat. He immediately began to mate with all the female rats again and again until eventually, he became exhausted. The females continued nudging and licking him, yet he did not respond. When a novel female was introduced into the box, he became alert and began to mate once again with the new female. This phenomenon is not limited to common rats.[7] The Coolidge effect is attributed to an increase in dopamine levels and the subsequent effect upon an animal’s limbic system.[8]

Human males experience a post-ejaculatory refractory period after sex. They are temporarily incapable of engaging in sex with the same female after ejaculation and require time to recover full sexual function. In popular reference, the Coolidge effect is the well-documented phenomenon that the post-ejaculatory refractory period is reduced or eliminated if a novel female becomes available.[9] This effect is cited by evolutionary biologists as one reason why males are more likely to desire sex with a greater number and variety of partners than females,[9] though of course sometimes human females are known to copulate with multiple and novel partners as well.

While the Coolidge effect is usually seen demonstrated by males—that is, males displaying renewed excitement with a novel female—Lester and Gorzalka developed a model to determine whether or not the Coolidge effect also occurs in females. Their experiment, which used hamsters instead of rats, found that it does occur to a lesser degrees in females.[3][4]

The fact these hunter-gatherer humans so effectivly articulate these relationship phases indicates this may just be an almost inescapable side effect of long-term relationships, no matter what social norms dictate.

Smoking does make you fat and insulin resistant. Pesticides in America.

[Reblog from Animal Pharm]

Modern Big Tobacco-Agra/Monsatan Crops

Crops are generally coated with pesticides for the last 30-50 years. Are they toxic? Pesticides are upregulated into the food chain via consumption (corn, soy) by feedlot livestock and poultry. Let’s not forget tobacco (cigarettes, snuff, cigars, etc). ‘Tobacco is a pesticide-intensive crop. With nearly 27 million pounds of pesticides (including insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and suckercides) applied to the U.S.-grown crop from 1994 to 1998, it ranks SIXTH in terms of the amount of pesticides applied per acre. The tobacco industry regards pesticides as essential to tobacco production, stating that “the crop could not be produced economically without them”.’

Additionally pesticides are employed in municipalities (public schools, parks, government land) and personal home use (termites, ant control, weeds control, lawns, etc). Although pesticides do not taste, smell or look toxic, they are not benign and without metabolic dysregulation consequences.

New studies in PubMed are cropping (pun intended) up in number pointing directly to insulin resistance, obesogenic, neurologic and inflammatory damage secondary to this broad group of pervasive chemicals known as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). They are difficult to avoid as once in the soil, air or bodies of water, fish, birds and animals, they typically fail to degrade and significantly impact the environment.

The researcher Alavanja states ‘Over 1 billion pounds of pesticides are used in the United State (US) each year and approximately 5.6 billion pounds are used worldwide (1). In many developing countries programs to control exposures are limited or non-existent. As a consequence; it has been estimated that as many as 25 million agricultural workers worldwide experience unintentional pesticide poisonings each year (4). In a large prospective study of pesticide users in the United States, the Agricultural Health Study, it was estimated that 16% of the cohort had at least one pesticide poisoning or an unusually high pesticide exposure episode in their lifetime (5).

Although attempts to reduce pesticide use through organic agricultural practices and the use of other technologies to control pests continue, exposure to pesticides occupationally, through home and garden use, through termite control or indirectly through spray drifts and through residues in household dust, and in food and water are common (6). The US Department of Agriculture has estimated that 50 million people in the United States obtain their drinking water from groundwater that is potentially contaminated by pesticides and other agricultural chemicals (7, 8). Children from 3-6 years old received most of their dermal and non-dietary oral doses from playing with toys and while playing on carpets which contributed the largest portion of their exposure (9-12).’

U.S.A. Obesity Trends With Pesticide Use

Guess what?

Pesticide use on crops grown in the South (tobacco) and Mid-West (corn, wheat, soy) trends well with U.S.A. obesity patterns [hat tip: LePine MD]. Above is the trend of obesity that starts mid-1980s then grows exponentially each few years. Maps are from Lim et al and BFRSS data.

Smart people in Korea (Lim et al) report that ‘There is an apparent overlap between areas in the USA where the herbicide, atrazine (ATZ), is heavily used and obesity-prevalence maps of people with a BMI over 30. Given that herbicides act on photosystem II of the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, which have a functional structure similar to mitochondria, we investigated whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of ATZ might cause obesity or insulin resistance by damaging mitochondrial function.’

Pesticides Kill Pests, Including Our Bug-like Mitochondria

It’s therefore not surprising to read about the toxic effects of pesticides on pests whose networked pathways overlap almost precisely with our own cells. Atrazine is a mitochondrial toxin, and our mitochondria are the sole energy generators and powerhouses whether the substrate is glycogen, glucose or fatty acids.

Mitochondrial Dysfunction Causes Fatness and Insulin Resistance (IR)

‘A close association between mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance is well established [1]–[3]. In in vitro studies, we found that artificial induction of mitochondrial dysfunction induced insulin resistance [4], [5].’ This is discussed by Lim et al. He and his colleagues performed an experiment on rodents. They fed low levels of atrazine to rats then examined lab parameters for insulin resistance (IR). What happened? The higher the dose of atrazine, the higher the obesity and insulin resistance. Atrazine was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, higher visceral (organ) fat deposition, higher blood glucoses and decreased energy metabolism.

Another group of researchers, Ruzzin et al, tested a similar hypothesis. They fed crude Atlantic salmon oil to rodents and examined IR parameters. They state ‘POPs accumulate in the lipid fraction of fish, and fish consumption represents a source of POP exposure to humans (Dougherty et al. 2000; Hites et al. 2004; Schafer and Kegley 2002). Therefore, certain European countries have dietary recommendations to limit the consumption of fatty fish per week (Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition 2004).’ They discovered similar insulin resistant results when they exposed fat cells in vitro to a POP mixture that mimicked the relative abundance of contaminants found in crude salmon oil. Insulin signalling was broken and impaired.

References

BRFSS, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System www.cdc.gov/brfss

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCNW-NgYZ2s [Obesity trend map and cdc slides]

http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/trend/maps/obesity_trends_2006.pdf [BRFSS raw data by state and year]

Pesticides Use and Exposure Extensive Worldwide. Michael C.R. AlavanjaRev Environ Health. 2009 Oct–Dec; 24(4): 303–309.

The Tobacco Industry and Pesticide Regulations: Case Studies from Tobacco Industry Archives. Patricia A. McDaniel, Gina Solomon, Ruth E. Malone. Environ Health Perspect. 2005 December; 113(12): 1659–1665.

Chronic Exposure to the Herbicide, Atrazine, Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Insulin Resistance. Soo Lim, Sun Young Ahn, In Chan Song, Myung Hee Chung, Hak Chul Jang, Kyong Soo Park, Ki-Up Lee, Youngmi Kim Pak, Hong Kyu LeePLoS ONE. 2009; 4(4): e5186.

Persistent Organic Pollutant Exposure Leads to Insulin Resistance Syndrome. Jérôme Ruzzin, Rasmus Petersen, Emmanuelle Meugnier, Lise Madsen, Erik-Jan Lock, Haldis Lillefosse, Tao Ma, Sandra Pesenti, Si Brask Sonne, Troels Torben Marstrand, Marian Kjellevold Malde, Zhen-Yu Du, Carine Chavey, Lluis Fajas, Anne-Katrine Lundebye, Christian Lehn Brand, Hubert Vidal, Karsten Kristiansen, Livar FrøylandEnviron Health Perspect. 2010 April; 118(4): 465–471.

Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Pesticides: A ReviewWissem Mnif, Aziza Ibn Hadj Hassine, Aicha Bouaziz, Aghleb Bartegi, Olivier Thomas, Benoit RoigInt J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 June; 8(6): 2265–2303.

Missing Link(s)

More information about gene expression and controlling our genes. Also interesting facts about exercise and coffee!!

A great post at Marks Daily Apple about gene expression research

More discussion that disease and other problems are not caused by simply posessing bad genes. Something actually has to turn them on!

While genes play a role in many disorders, so do the conditions and circumstances of your life and the decisions you make.

More about gene control related to MS (multiple sclorosis)

Genes are cool!

The most difinitive guide to obesity. Hyper-palatable modern food and how it screws up your body’s fat regulating mechanisms.

Poor diet may have behavioral consequences

A lack of zinc in your diet may be making you aggressive.

(From the Geenpasture.org archive)

A fascinating article in Psychology Today focused on the origin of violent behavior. Was it nature or nutrition? Could the underlying cause be in one’s upbringing or in their genes? Or just maybe it could be some type of nutritional imbalance.

Taking the nutritional stance was William Walsh, Ph.D. and his team at the Health Research Institute in Illinois. Walsh and his colleagues published a study in Physiology & Behavior (1997) where they compared the results of blood tests given to 135 “assaultive” young males—who were between 3 and 20 years of age—to those of 18 in the control group without any history of violence. The results were staggering: The violent males had higher copper and lower zinc levels than the control group. The higher the copper and lower the zinc, the more aggressive and violent the behavior.

When the aggressive young males were treated with therapeutic doses of zinc, their aggressive episodes were substantially lessened.

Wow!

[Read More Here]